Posts Tagged ‘Gouvernance’

Open World Forum: improvements needed as well as for the french FLOSS ecosystem

2014/10/30

Maybe it could be strange to speak about improvements whereas the event has not yet started, but there are already clearly areas where improvement will be needed if the event wants to continue being a reference one at least in France, and more over at european level.

For such an event, the Web site is key. This is the external face to the world. This year, up to last week it was a complete mess, without valid information. When I announced my various activities during OWF 2014, I gave some links to that Web site in order for people to be able to read more info. As of now, none of these links work anymore :-(

I’ve seen many times requests to update some content with what we were provideing without effect. Looking at the current agenda, I don’t see one of my sessions anymore, timing have changed also in between, … The change of location compared to last year is also a regression from an exhibitor point of view: The Eurosite site has no real structure to allow booth to be managed in a correct way and attendees to encounter sponsors on their booth in a nice way. I can ensure you that it’s very different compared to most events I’m attending such as LinuxCon e.g. where I was this month.

While different, the Solution Linux Event never exhibited such issues. Of course, the program and its role are different. I heard that the idea of uniting forces around a single event was considered. It could be beneficial wrt sponsors, reinforce the impact of the event and attract more audience, more contributions, enlarging the scope by uniting programs which do not overlap too much, proposing a real exhibition area, including communities as well as professionals. Also it could help having a larger group working on the overall program (I’m part of the Linux Solutions conference board, but even if I proposed many times to help, was never really included in the OWF’s one) so each could focus more on its area, and also have a larger set of permanent staff to help with the overall organization and communication.

I look forward to such an evolution and would be very supportive of it. I’m then ready to convince HP as well to continue to sponsor such a central event in France, whereas under its current format, I doubt it could be the case next year of OWF alone.

I’m also thinking it could help the french FLOSS ecosystem to speak with a stronger voice and be listened more by enterprises and the government and the various administration bodies. Today no serious infrastructure solution can be deployed without FLOSS components: Web based technologies, Cloud, Big Data, Software Defined Enterprise, Security, Virtualization (including NFV), SDN, … So it’s really time in France to stop the useless battles between FLOSS companies and unite all of them behind whatever structure that will be representative (such as the CNLL e.g.) to have a stronger voice and develop jobs, companies and business in our country at least. While supporting the OWF 2014, I don’t see the Open Source group of the Syntec Numérique able to play this role. It used to when the right people were involved, it’s not anymore (I know a bit attending the meeting through a conf call system), and hasn’t produced anything useful to the ecostystem since this guide IMO.

The french community of companies delivering FLOSS services/integration/software (the FLOSS providers, term advocated by Laurent Seguin which I like or the incubators I proposed earlier) shouldn’t stay quite: their customers need that they speak with a strong and united voice to defend their ideas and show the advantages of their solutions.

If you want to talk of that or anything else related to Open Source, feel free to come to one of the sessions I’m involved in… if the agenda is indeed correct (and timing respected as everything is very dense) you should find me speaking of FLOSS governance in Namur room at 9:00AM, collaboration in OpenStack at 11:15AM in room Luxembourg or OpenStack community in room Amsterdam at 12:10AM.

Or if you’re still there next week, during the OpenStack Summit, I’ll be at the HP Expert Bar session and around till Friday morning.

Speaking at Open World Forum 2014

2014/09/29

So I’ve again been retained as a speaker for the upcoming Open World Forum 2014, which is back in Paris. I was expecting it, as Martin Michlmayr confirmed my proposal on “Open Source Governance: what’s hot?” in the Legal and licensing aspects of open source track. This will be Friday the 31st of October between 1:30 and 3:30PM.

But I’ll also be a panelist in the “Control Your Cloud” track lead by Jean-Pierre Laisné, in a round table dedicated to OpenStack and the coopetition ecosystem around it. I’m right now building the panel with Jean-Pierre, so will announce the list soon. This will be Friday the 31st of October between 4:10PM and 6:10PM.

And finally I was really surprised looking at my info to see that I also had another talk accepted in the DevOps / ALM track lead by Jonathan Clarke ! I’ll talk about “Continuous Packaging with docker and Project-Builder.org”. Well, my demo, which is due for LinuxCon EMEA, should then be ready and fully working as well as my slideset and content which I still need to develop ! This will be Friday the 31st of October between 9:00 and 12:20AM.

So a busy Friday as it seems. But I’ll also be there on Thursday, and hopefully as well for the OpenStack Summit the week after, but I don’t have a seat for now, so let’s see…

As usual, you can catch me at the end of the talks (even if this time, I won’t have as much time as in other events) and discuss about what you’re interested in that is also of interest to me !

Speaking at LinuxCon EMEA 2014

2014/08/30

I received confirmation and support for my travel at LinuxCon EMEA 2014 which will be in Düsseldorf, Germany from the 13th to the 15th of October. I’m pretty proud to have up to now presented in all the european LinuxCon events since 2011.

I’ll again animate a round table on FLOSS Governance. I’m now contacting potential panelists for this one and should announce them soon.

But I’ll also have a technical session in parallel on a subject I’m working on at the moment, and should get interest as it is docker related: Multi-OS Continuous Packaging with Docker and Project-Builder.org.

Ok, so now I need to go back to my source code to make it work and publish it before the conf don’t you think so ? :-)

First day at LinuxCon NA 2014

2014/08/22

Porec

Interesting to pass from vacation with family in Croatia to France after 10 hours of drive and then the day after being in a plane, flying to Chicago to attend my 3rd LinuxCon, held this time in the mythic Chicago city.

Chicago

While I arrived Monday evening, I had time to catch up some mail, make some conf calls on Tuesday before attending the first part of the event, which was the VIP dinner. An opportunity to talk to HP colleagues I met for the first time physically, even if we already interacted electronically previously.

VIP dinner

A view on the VIP Dinner

Wednesday the 20th was the first day of the event which started as usual with Jim Zemlin’s Keynote. This time he chose to talk about what the Linux Foundation rules disallow: The Linux Foundation itself ! And more largely about the roles of foundations to support open source development, their key cleaning facility role.

Jim Zemlin

Jim had a quite funny slide exaplining how everybody is seeing him, while what he is really doing is cleaning stuff so Linus, Greg and thouands of others could code and manage Linux.

He also announced the new LF certification program (Certified sysadmin and Engineers). While I understand the need of having more recognized Open Source ad Linux Professionals, unlinked to a company (such as the RHCE one) I wonder whether we were needing a new certification wile we do have LPI. I hope the 2 will cooperate to avoid again proliferation. Not that proliferation is bad per se. But why dedicate multiple times efforts to create training supports, manage registrations, … when someone already works on that, maybe in a different way, but maybe patchable to be adopted by the LF. Hopefully this will be solved somehow.

LF certifications

After that we had the also traditional Linux Kernel panel moderated by Greg Kroah-Hartmann with Andy, S, Andrew Morton and Linus Torvalds of course. Nothing really new came out. Anyway, it’s always refreshing to see our heros on stage full of confidence and hope for what they do.

Kernel Round Table

Linus insisted once more on the fact he wants Linux to be more dominant on the desktop market. As a 21 years linux desktop user myself, I can only be in agreement with that. Where is however the docker of the desktop, that will make everybody want to change and move to it ? When people see my Mageia distro they’re always surprised how many stuff you can do out of the box with a Linux Desktop. Phones have helped people go away from the monopoly interface but Macs do not help bringing back people to Linux. If at least all people attending LinuxCon and developing FLOSS would run Linux, that would be great !

Linus Torvalds

Then it was time for elective sessions. I chose first to know more about devstack.
Sean Dague from HP presented OpenStack in 10 Minutes with devstack
devstack pulls everything from git. As it heavily modifies your system so do rather that in a VM/Container. devstack launches tempest (the OpenStack test suite) at the end for the install. Sean insisted on the flow of requests generated inside OpenStack and demonstrated how you can easily modify the devstack environment and re-run it to test easily your modification.

devstack provides an easy way to support modifications through a conf file. Example given if you add
API_RATE_LIMIT=False
you’ll avoid waiting for an answers from the server in case of devstack exceeding the standard rate of queries.
You can also use localrc.conf to pass specific variables up to the right component.

In order to use it, you’d need 4GB RAM (recommended). It can run in a VM (cirros will work nested). Sean warned that it does not reclone git trees by default and clean.sh should put everything back in order (but cleans stuff !)

Sean Dague

Good presentation, easy to follow and having a quick demo part which confirms that devstack is easy to use :-)

Then I attended Joe Brockmeier’s (Red Hat) presentation around Solving the package issue

Joe explained the notion of SW collections (living under /opt). It’s Available for RHEL, CentOS and Fedora. It brings a new scl command. If you type for example
scl enable php54 “app –option”
that app uses now php 5.4 while the rest of the system ignores it.
For that you’ll need new packages: scl-utils and scl-utils-build
There is a tool spec2scl to convert spec files to generate scl compatible packages.
For more info you can look at http://softwarecollections.org

A remark I made to myself and which was later explicitely said during the presentation is that scl is useful for RHEL to provide newer versions of SW onto the enterprise distributions, while it can also help provide older versions of SW into Fedora (which is moving so fast that not all SW can adapt !).
It’s a sort of Debian backports for RHEL.
Joe also presented rpm-ostree (derived from ostree, git-like for system binaries providing an immutable tree). Under development for now, so not completely usable and probably the least interesting solution.
He moved on with docker, but was pretty generic (on purpose) and seeing it as complementary to package management, whether I think docker is another way of deploying software, which is not caring of packages by providing a layered deployment approach. While I have packaged docker for Mageia, I’m not yet familiar eough with it to be sure of that, and I’m currently working on combining it with project-builder.org. So will comment later on on that.

Joe Brockmeier

Then it was time to animate the FLOSS Governance roundtable for which I was attending LinuxCon. I had what I think is probably the best panel to cover the vast topic with Eileen Evans from HP, Tom Callaway from Red Hat, Gary O’Neall from Source Auditor Inc., Bradley Kuhn from Software Freedom Conservancy (and of course 45 minutes wasn’t sufficient to talk about all the subjects part of this), but I think the interactions were very interesting and lively and hope the audience enjoyed them and learned new aspects of this capital topic for our ecosystem. Of course we talked about licenses, SPDX and its future new 2.0 version, but also of foundations (echoing Jim Zemlin’s keynote), contribution agreements or tax usage (Thanks Bradley !).

FLOSS Governance Roundtable

And this is just the first of a series of such round tables I’ll lead in future events, but more on that later on.

After that, I discussed with Bradley Kuhn and Jilayne Lovejoy about licenses, AGPL, and various related topics, and their feedback were as usual very rich.

Was then time to go back to the latest keynote sessions. The first one I followed was from a new company (for me) CEO, Jay Rogers from Local Motors who tries to make open hardware in the automotive sector.Worth looking at and following whether they will be successful.

Jay Rogers

Then, our own Eileen Evans was on stage to explain her view on the new FLOSS Professional. And I think at her place I’d have been even more impressed as she had a full room so probably some pressure to talk to all these devs and devops. And I think her voice showed that at the begining. But when she entered in the details of the presentation, she did as usual a great job and was particularly convincing. She showed how the FLOSS professional was more than others issued from diverse backgrounds, as she illustrated with her own one. She also showed the variety of activities that each of these people have to cope with everyday, again with an illustration of one of her day of work passing from a contract management or OSRB meeting to an OpenStack foundation board conf call.

Eileen Evans keynote

And that approach of the new FLOSS professional was a convincing echo to Jim Zemlin’s call for more professionals and the focus on people that many speakers have underlined. The FLOSS ecosystem indeed needs so many various competencies in addition to developers and FLOSS is so ubiquituous that the lack of resources is delaying some projects. And Eileen explained why this notion of FLOSS Professional is arising now. Which is in short because FLOSS usage has moved from hobbist developing for themselves to professional developing during work hours. And she also covered the impact on companies where the work in network/communities, between peers is the rule compared to the siloed classical approach. And so companies need people understanding this way of working to evolve.

Eileen Evans

It was then time to catch a bus and enjoy discussing with peers at the Museum of Science and Industry during the evening event where we could also explore the museum.

Museum of Science and Industry of Chicago

Open Source Governance Roundtable at LinuxCon North America 2014 in Chicago

2014/07/18

I wasn’t expected to be there this year, but finally one of my proposal which was on waiting list was accepted, so I’m able to be back again this year !

I’ll animate a round table on Open Source Governance during the upcoming LinuxCon in Chicago ! I really need to thank the HP Open Source Program Office and the HP EG Presales management which are funding my travel there ! Without their support, it would not have occured.

The goal of this round table is to share the latest news in the area of Open Source Governance.
Topics covered will include:

  • Status on SPDX, LSB, FHS
  • licenses (e.g: analysis, new comers, usage example),
  • tools (e.g: license analysis, software evaluation, reference web sites),
  • best governance practices (e.g: return of experience, distribution adoption of tags, portability)

I think I’ve one of the best panel that could be gathered in the US around this topic:

  • Eileen Evans, VP & Deputy General Counsel of Cloud Computing and Open Source, HP
  • Bradley M. Kuhn, President & Distinguished Technologist of Software Freedom Conservancy
  • Gary O’Neall, Responsible for product development and technology for Source Auditor Inc
  • Tom Callaway, University Outreach & Fedora Special Projects, Red Hat

So don’t hesitate to come and attend this session, which will be, I’m sure, enlightening and informative on the latest hot topics in the area of Open Source compliance, governance and licenses.
And if you want to talk with me on anything MondoRescue, Project-Builder.org, UEFI, HP and Linux or early music, I’ll be around during the full event. See you there.

Gouvernance informatique: Il est temps d’y intégrer l’Open Source

2014/01/24

Dans le cadre de mes activités pour le Conseil des technologistes d’HP France, j’ai écrit un article pour le Webzine IT experts sur la l’intégration de Open Source et la gouvernance informatique disponible sur http://www.it-expertise.com/gouvernance-informatique-il-faut-integrer-lopen-source/. Un grand merci à Aurélie Magniez pour m’avoir aidé à faire cette publication.

Ci-dessous, une version légèrement modifiée qui tient compte de retours et rétablit certaines formules auxquelles je tiens, quoique moins journalistiquement correctes et certains liens (jugés trop nombreux par le Webzine, mais je tiens à citer mes sources, et Tim Berners-Lee ne les a pas inventés pour que l’on ne s’en serve pas non ? :-))

Bonne lecture !

Aujourd’hui en 2013, toutes les entités, publiques comme privées, en France, comme partout dans le monde, utilisent massivement des Logiciels Free, Libres et Open Source (abrégé en FLOSS (1)). Quelques exemples de cet état de fait sont fournis par la Linux Foundation, comme les 600 000 télévisions intelligentes vendues quotidiennement fonctionnant sous Linux ou les 1,3 millions de téléphones Andoïd activés chaque jour. Le dernier rapport de top500.org, présentant les super-calculateurs mondiaux, indique une utilisation de Linux à 96,4%. Des sociétés ayant aujourd’hui un impact quotidien sur notre environnement numérique telles que FaceBook ou Twitter ont non seulement bâti leur infrastructure sur une grande variété de FLOSS, mais ont aussi publié de grandes quantités de code et des projets complets sous licence libre. Ceci concerne aussi des acteurs plus classiques du monde de l’informatique comme HP ou IBM.

Ceci peut sembler normal, car on évolue là dans le monde du numérique, mais le phénomène touche tous les secteurs comme le montre une récente étude de l’INSEE, qui reporte que 43% des entreprises françaises d’au moins 10 personnes utilisent des suites bureautique FLOSS ou encore que 15% des sociétés de construction utilisent un système d’exploitation FLOSS par exemple. Cette large adoption se trouve corroborée par le développement de la filière FLOSS en France, comme rapporté par le CNLL, représentant en 2013 2,5 milliard d’Euros et 30 000 emplois.

Enfin, le secteur public n’est pas en reste avec la publication en septembre 2012 de la circulaire du premier ministre qui reconnait la longue pratique de l’administration des FLOSS, et incite celle-ci, à tous les niveaux, à un “bon usage du logiciel libre”, ce qui se vérifie dans certains ministères comme celui de l’intérieur ou de l’économie. Le ministère de l’éducation nationale a ainsi déployé 23 000 serveurs EOLE sous Linux et utilise de nombreux projets FLOSS pour la gestion multi-fonctions (réseau, sécurité, partage) des établissements scolaires.

Services impliqués dans la gouvernance FLOSS

Dans ce contexte d’utilisation généralisée, se posent certaines questions quant à la gouvernance particulière à mettre en place ou l’adaptation de celle existante pour accroître l’usage, la distribution, la contribution au FLOSS, tant pour les fournisseurs que pour les utilisateurs de ces technologies. En effet, les FLOSS ont des spécificités tant techniques qu’organisationnelles (rapport à la communauté, méthodologie de développement, licence utilisée) qui ont un impact sur la façon de les gérer dans une entité. La Gouvernance Open Source, aujourd’hui, doit donc être partie intégrante d’une Gouvernance Informatique.

Contrairement à ce qu’une rapide analyse pourrait laisser penser, ce n’est pas uniquement le service informatique qui est concerné par l’utilisation des FLOSS. Celle-ci touche la totalité de l’entité et le modèle de gouvernance doit donc être adapté en conséquence. En effet, le service des achats se voit souvent court-circuité par l’utilisation de composants logiciels téléchargés et non achetés en suivant les procédures qu’il met en place, le service du personnel ne dispose pas de contrats de travail statuant sur les contributions des employés à des projets FLOSS (ne parlons pas des stagiaires ou co-traitants), le service juridique doit apprendre à distinguer la licence Apache de la GPLv2, ou v3, le service de propriété intellectuelle considérer si telle modification faite à un projet FLOSS peut ou doit être reversée au projet, et dans quel contexte, voire le PDG évaluer, lors d’une scission de sa société en différentes entitées juridiques, l’impact représenté sur la redistribution de logiciels faite à cette occasion et le respect des licences utilisées. Ce ne sont que quelques exemples des questions auxquelles les entités doivent répondre dans le cadre d’une Gouvernance Informatique intégrant les FLOSS.

Ceci n’est pas un débat oiseux: il y a eu maintenant trop d’exemples allant jusqu’au procès et sur des problématiques de non-respect des licences FLOSS pour que les entreprises et services publics ignorent le problème. Les conséquences tant financières que sur leur image de marque peuvent être très importantes et causer des dommages beaucoup plus graves que ne le représente la mise en conformité (qui consiste le plus souvent en la seule publications des codes sources modifiés).

Il ne s’agit pas ici d’énoncer des éléments qui tendraient à restreindre l’utilisation des FLOSS dans une entité. Au contraire, les bénéfices de leur utilisation sont aujourd’hui trop évidents, la baisse des coûts induite par la mutualisation, les gains technologiques d’avoir des souches logicielles si versatiles et éprouvées doivent juste s’accompagner des mesures de gestion nécessaires pour en retirer tous les bénéfices annoncés. L’analyse des risques fait partie des choix quotidiens exercés au sein d’une entité et de même que pour une démarche qualité, l’impulsion doit venir du sommet de la hiérarchie de l’entité. Celle-ci doit soutenir la création des instances nécessaires à l’établissement d’une gouvernance FLOSS en leur donnant le pouvoir requis et l’interaction avec les différents services de l’entité.

Composants d’une gouvernance FLOSS

Tout d’abord, il s’agira de développer la compréhension de l’écosystème libre au sein de l’entité pour en appréhender les spécificités.

La première d’entre elles est la licence gouvernant les FLOSS. Comme pour toute utilisation d’un logiciel, ou d’un service, un utilisateur se voit décrit ses droits et ses devoirs au sein de ce document. Ceux-ci diffèrent selon que la licence est permissive (type Apache v2 par exemple), qui permet une utilisation (y compris pour des développement non-FLOSS) et une redistribution avec peu de contraintes (mentions légales et paternité par exemple). Elle permet ainsi à des sociétés de vendre des versions propriétaires d’Andoïd distribué sous Licence Apache v2 embarquées dans leurs téléphones portables. C’est ce qui permet de considérer cette licence comme “libre”. En regard on donnera également l’exemple des licences de gauche d’auteur (copyleft en anglais, type GPL v2 par exemple), qui permettent une utilisation tant que le logiciel distribué s’accompagne des sources (éventuellement modifiées) servant à le fabriquer. Elle permet à des projets comme le noyau Linux d’être développé par des milliers de développeurs tout en restant toujours accessible dans toutes ses variantes par la mise à disposition de son code source, dû à cette contrainte. C’est ce qui permet de considérer cette licence comme “libre”. Simplement les libertés sont vues ici sous l’angle du projet (qui le reste ad vitam aeternam) plutôt que sous celui de l’utilisateur comme dans l’autre cas. C’est la raison pour laquelle toutes ces licences sont considérées comme Open Source par l’OSI.

Une entité doit donc choisir les briques FLOSS qu’elle souhaite utiliser en fonction de l’usage prévu pour respecter les droits et devoirs d’usage codifiés dans les licences (ni plus ni moins qu’avec une offre non-FLOSS), sachant que, dans la plupart des cas, l’élément déclenchant l’application de la licence est la distribution du logiciel. Ainsi une société peut parfaitement utiliser un logiciel sous licence GPL v2, y faire des modifications et ne pas les publier, tant que l’usage reste interne à sa structure juridique (cas fréquent en mode utilisation de logiciel dans un département informatique). En revanche, si elle l’incorpore à un produit qu’elle commercialise, elle devra juste se mettre en conformité avec la licence et fournir en parallèle du produit un acccès aux dites sources.

Ceci n’est finalement pas si compliqué, eu égard aux gains énormes qu’elle peut en retirer en bénéficiant d’une brique logicielle éprouvée qu’elle n’a ni à développer, ni à maintenir. Dans tous les cas, il est important que son service juridique ait une compréhension des droits et devoirs des licences utilisées pour apporter le conseil requis, comme lors de la signature de contrats avec tout fournisseur.

On le voit, la formation du service juridique est à la base de la mise en place de toute gouvernance. D’autre part, il faut organiser au sein de l’entité la mise en relation entre ce service juridique et les équipes de développement. Non seulement pour qu’elles apprennent à se connaître, mais aussi pour qu’elles échangent sur leurs besoins réciproques et qu’elles comprennent comment chacune cherche à protéger l’entité pour laquelle elle oeuvre. Les uns le faisant eu égard au respect des règles de droit, ce qui comprend l’explication envers les développeurs des licences libres, les autres eu égard au mode d’utilisation des composants techniques spécifiques des équipes de développement.

Personnellement, en tant qu’ingénieur de formation, il m’a été très bénéfique de discuter avec divers avocats spécialistes des licences libres, pour mieux comprendre leur volonté de protéger l’entreprise pour laquelle ils travaillent et comment ils devaient le faire dans ce contexte. Et réciproquement, je sais que les informations techniques et exemples parfois complexes d’agrégats de composants logiciels les aident en retour à mieux tenir compte des cas particuliers qui peuvent se faire jour. La communication sur ce sujet doit dépasser dans l’entité les structures classiques et fonctionner comme une communauté.

Du reste, la seconde spécificité du logiciel libre est le fait qu’il est développé par une communauté de personnes partageant un intérêt pour ce logiciel. Il en existe de toute taille (d’un développeur assurant tout, jusqu’à plusieurs centaines de personnes comme les larges fondations comme Apache ou OpenStack). Etudier une communauté avant d’utiliser le composant libre qu’elle produit est une bonne pratique pour avoir des informations sur sa vitalité, son organisation, sa feuille de route, en plus des caractéristiques purement techniques du composant. Certains sites comme Ohloh peuvent aider à se forger une opinion dans ce domaine, pour les projets suivis. De même qu’il peut être alors pertinent de se poser la question des modes de contributions en retour. Cela peut consister en des correctifs, du code apportant de nouvelles fonctions, de la documentation, des traductions, une animation de communauté, de l’achat de prestation intellectuelle auprès de professionnels oeuvrant sur le composant ou un soutien financier à l’organisation d’un événement permettant le rassemblement physique de la communauté. Certaines entreprises, comme la Compagnie Nationale des Commissaires aux Comptes témoignent de leurs contributions en retour envers un projet tel que LibreOffice.

Comme précédemment, chacun de ces aspects pourra faire l’objet d’une étude dans le volet Open Source de la Gouvernance Informatique. On notera que la gestion de la proprété intellectuelle sera à considérer tout particulièrement pour les contributions sous forme de code, et en liaison avec la licence utilisée. Mais cet aspect peut aussi avoir un impact sur les contrats de travail des employés, des co-traitants, des stagiaires, afin de déterminer sous quelles conditions leurs contributions sont autorisées.

Encore une fois, il s’agit d’inciter les entités utilisatrices de logiciels libres à ne pas se contenter d’être de simples utilisatrices de FLOSS, mais à être actrices de l’écosystème et à contribuer à leur tour à l’améliorer en s’intégrant dans les communautés. Le dynamisme actuel autour des FLOSS est le fait du soutien très actif de nombreux utilisateurs. Pour ne citer qu’un exemple, on regardera la synergie créée autour du projet GENIVI par ses 120+ membres, dont de nombreuses sociétés hors secteur informatique.

Enfin la dernière spécifcité du logiciel libre est la méthodologie de développement utilisée par la communauté. Quoiqu’elles soient toutes attachées à l’accès au code, elles varient énormément d’un projet à l’autre, en fonction de sa taille, de son style de gouvernance, des outils utilisés et de son historique. Mais il est important pour une entité qui souhaite interagir avec une communauté d’en comprendre la culture. Si le noyau Linux a une méthodologie organisée autour d’un “dictateur bénévole” (Linus Torvalds) qui prend les ultimes décisions et de ses lieutenants, nommés, en qui il a toute confiance pour prendre les décisions concernant une branche de développement, d’autres projets comme OpenStack cherchent à adopter le mode le plus “méridémocratique” en procédant à l’élection des représentants techniques des branches du projet par les développeurs, et à celle des représentants au conseil d’administration par la totalité des membres de la fondation, quels que soient leurs rôles. Le processus d’intégration continue d’OpenStack implique des étapes précises pour y ajouter un patch par exemple. Cela nécessite d’abord une application sur l’arbre courant sans erreur, avant de devoir recevoir deux votes positifs puis de satisfaire le passage de l’ensemble des tests automatiques prévus. Et ceci s’applique aussi bien aux représentants techniques des branches du projet qui proposent des centaines de patches par an, ou au contributeur occasionnel faisant une modification mineure de documentation. En revanche, celui qui souhaite soumettre une modification sur le noyau Linux devra passer par des listes de diffusion où les échanges peuvent parfois se révéler vifs, et s’adapter aux desiderata potentiellement différents des mainteneurs de branches.

Bonnes pratiques de gouvernance FLOSS

Face à tous ces aspects de ce monde foisonnant, certaines bonnes pratiques simples peuvent permettre aux entreprises de faire les bons choix et de s’assurer une utilisation optimale des FLOSS en en tirant le meilleur profit sans mettre à risque leur bonne réputation par des actions mal vues des communautés.

Une première bonne pratique peut consister à créer un comité Open Source. Par exemple, pour un grand groupe, il peut être utile pour la direction générale de nommer des représentants des différents services (achats, ressources humaines, informatique, technique, juridique, propriété intellectuelle) pour définir la politique à mettre en place. Ce comité devra se réunir régulièrement, tant dans la phase de définition de la partie Open Source de la Gouvernance Informatique, qu’ultérieurement pour la réviser sur la base des retours des utilisateurs et l’évolution de projets. Il devra également avoir les moyens associés à ses missions. Un groupe de travail du Syntec Numérique a développé, pour les aider dans cette activité, des contrats types pour leurs fournisseurs, leur demandant de préciser avec leur livraison logicielle, l’inventaire exhaustif des licences utilisées. Une présentation sur les contrats faite au sein de ce groupe pourra être aussi consultée avec profit. La FSF France propose aussi des avenants de contrats de travail type pour les employés contribuant à des projets libres, et l’AFUL des modèles économiques et financement de projets FLOSS ou de communautés. Il sera ensuite facile de donner des missions et des pouvoirs plus étendus à ce groupe de personnes quand l’utilisation des FLOSS augmente. Dans le cadre d’une PME, un correspondant FLOSS sera sans doute suffisant (comme il peut y avoir un correspondant sécurité ou CNIL), tâche qui pourra même être sous-traitée à des sociétés specialisées dans le domaine.

Une fois le comité/correspondant nommé et la politique FLOSS établie, il faudra prévoir des cycles de formations. D’une part pour le service juridique pour le cas où il manquerait de compétences sur le domaine spécifique des licences libres. La société Alterway propose par exemple une formation par un juriste pour des juristes. D’autre part, en interne, auprès de l’ensemble du personnel pour expliquer cette nouvelle politique FLOSS.

En parallèle, il est important d’avoir une vision précise de l’utilisation actuelle des FLOSS dans son entité. Notamment pour vérifier que leur utilisation est conforme aux licences sous lesquelles ils sont utilisés. Les non-conformités sont plus souvent dûes à la méconnaissance qu’à une réelle volonté d’enfreindre les licences. Cette tâche peut paraître fastidieuse de prime abord, mais elle est à mon sens fondamentale pour se prémunir, en particulier si votre activité vous amène à redistribuer du logiciel à vos clients. Heureusement des outils existent pour automatiser ce travail d’inventaire et faciliter l’analyse des licences utilisées. Le premier à recommander est libre: FOSSology a été développé par HP pour son utilisation interne, puis rendu libre en 2007 sous licence GPLv2. Il collecte dans une base de données toutes les meta-données associées aux logiciels analyés (il peut traiter des distributions Linux entières sans problème) et permet l’analyse des licences réellement trouvées dans le code depuis une interface Web. De nombreuses entités outre HP comme Alcatel-Lucent, l’INRIA ou OW2 l’utilisent, y compris pour certains, en couplage avec leurs forges de développement. Mais son accès libre et sa facilité de mise en oeuvre ne le réserve pas qu’aux grands groupes et il devrait être systématiquement utilisé comme complément naturel d’un gestionnaire de source, ou d’outillage d’intégration continue. En complément, des outils non-FLOSS peuvent également aider à ce travail d’inventaire en donnant accès à des bases préétablies de composants connus et déjà inventoriés et fournissent de nombreuses autres fonctions. La société française Antelink, émanation de l’INRIA, a développé une grande expertise dans ce domaine et a couplé son outillage avec FOSSology. D’autres acteurs tels que Blackduck et Palamida ont également un outillage complémentaire à considérer.

On pourra de plus prévoir ultérieurement un mode de déclaration des usages de FLOSS, voire, si les requêtes sont nombreuses et régulières, créer un comité de revue spécifique en charge de les évaluer et de les approuver.

Enfin certains documents de référence tel que le Guide Open Source du Syntec Numérique, les fondamentaux de la Gouvernance des logiciels libres, la vision des grandes entreprises sur la gouvernance et maturité de l’Open Source et le site de référence FOSSBazaar pourront permettre un approfondissement des sujets évoqués et donner des bonnes pratiques additionnelles quant à la mise en oeuvre d’une gouvernance Open Source.

Et pour ceux qui souhaiteraient être accompagnés dans la démarche, des sociétés telles que Smile, Alterway, Linagora, Atos, Inno3 ou HP disposent de prestations d’aide à la mise en oeuvre d’une gouvernance Open Source. Mais que vous le fassiez seuls ou accompagnés, il est temps et j’espère que cet article vous aura donné quelques clefs pour intégrer l’Open Source dans votre politique de Gouvernance Informatique.

(1): Dans tout ce document, on utilise le terme de FLOSS comme terme générique recouvrant aussi bien la notion de « logiciel libre », « Free Software » qu’« Open Source », tout en sachant que des nuances existent.

Attending OWF and LinuxCon EMEA in October

2013/09/28

I just know it since yesterday, but I’ll be attending Open World Forum 2013 in order to have multiple customer and press related meetings next week near Paris. If you want to talk about Open Source at HP, Linux related topics such as continuous packaging or disaster recovery, you should find me on the HP booth. Won’t speak this time but will also surely be around the governance track.

I’ll also attend LinuxCon EMEA 2013 in Edinburgh later this month. This time I’ll speak about an ITIL Open Source solution stack I’m involved in for a customer, and will explain how you can today, by combining the appropriate tools such as iTop, Centreon/Shinken and OCS/Fusion Inventory set up the bases of an ITIL compliant Open Source management environment, full featured and highly customizable.

Again feel free to come and talk about anything I’m able to reasonably talk (including early music if you want ;-))

Fleur Pellerin dans la Silicon Valley sans voir HP ?

2013/05/24

D’après le blog d’Emmanuel Paquette, journaliste à l’Express, Fleur Pellerin ferait du 1er au 5 juin un déplacement dans la Silicon Valley.

A ma grande surprise, l’article ne mentionne pas HP dans les sociétés visitées. Je sais que cela fait moins mode que Facebook ou Twitter, mais la compagnie fondée dans un garage il y a 74 ans, et pour laquelle j’ai le plaisir de travailler, reste non seulement la première société dans les TIC au niveau mondial, (ou la seconde derrière Apple selon Fortune) mais elle reste aussi un employeur d’importance en France (environ 5000 personnes), avec des pôles de vente et de support locaux, mais aussi des structures européennes ou mondiales représentées.

J’espère que le cabinet de Fleur Pellerin contactera Gérald Karsenti, le PDG de HP en France, Je suis sûr qu’il se fera un plaisir d’au moins mettre en relation Mme la ministre avec Meg Whitman pour qu’elles puissent se rencontrer en Californie et échanger utilement. Avec le soutient que Meg apporte aux projets OpenStack, Hadoop, Linux et tant d’autres, la discussion pourrait même se porter sur comment HP pourrait aider en France à la mise en oeuvre de la directive du premier ministre sur l’utilisation préférentielle des logiciels libres dans l’administration. Et je veux bien être mis à contribution sur ce sujet au sein du Technology Council HP France ;-)

Nous pourrons du reste discuter de cela et de plein d’autres choses lors du Salon Solutions Linux à Paris la semaine prochaine !

FLOSS governance news

2012/08/31

While at LinuxCon in San Diego, the SPDX working group of the Linux Foundation announced its 1.1 version of its specification. Quite an achievement, and probably the start of its real adoption by Open Source projects … providing enough tool do support it, and help projects in their identification tasks. I hope lots of large FLOSS consumers (HP included) will start contributing SPDX descriptions to upstream projects, helping them adopting it as it brings value on both side.

And one way to help will probably the support of this 1.1 SPDX spec by FOSSology in the future. For now the news around the tool is that a public instance is available, hosted by the Universty of Nebraska. This is a good news for Open Source projects that will be able to assess easily their licenses with it, without having the hassle to install and maintain their own ! Hopfully, more forges (as what OW2 has done) will also provide that service to the projects they’re incubating.

Just be aware that the code you’ll upload to that instance will be available for everybody to see, so do not post non-FLOSS code there, if you want it to remain secret ! If you’re developing closed source software, then install you’re own FOSSology instance instead !

Time to finish my FOSSology presentation update for tomorrow’s talk !

Presenting FOSSology at LinuxCon, San Diego next week

2012/08/21

I always find strange to be accepted as a speaker to LinuxCon on a subject for which I’m much less an expert than the other ones I proposed for which I’m leading the projects ! It happened last year for the EMEA event, and same stuff again this year for the US one.

But I won’t be criticizing here, as it’s my first possibility to visit the US west coast, and also my first time as a speaker to LinuxCon US so Champagne !! So I’ll be talking about FOSSology, the HP sponsored GPL Licenses analyzer tool.

So if you happen to be around, and want to discuss abour FLOSS, MondoRescue, Project-Builder.org, HP and Open Source, or something else such as early music, then feel free to come and talk. Well I’m sure you won’t come to see me, won’t you, but once you’re there to see the stars, just come and say hello ;-)


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 106 other followers