Posts Tagged ‘project-builder.org’

Speaking at Open World Forum 2014

2014/09/29

So I’ve again been retained as a speaker for the upcoming Open World Forum 2014, which is back in Paris. I was expecting it, as Martin Michlmayr confirmed my proposal on “Open Source Governance: what’s hot?” in the Legal and licensing aspects of open source track. This will be Friday the 31st of October between 1:30 and 3:30PM.

But I’ll also be a panelist in the “Control Your Cloud” track lead by Jean-Pierre Laisné, in a round table dedicated to OpenStack and the coopetition ecosystem around it. I’m right now building the panel with Jean-Pierre, so will announce the list soon. This will be Friday the 31st of October between 4:10PM and 6:10PM.

And finally I was really surprised looking at my info to see that I also had another talk accepted in the DevOps / ALM track lead by Jonathan Clarke ! I’ll talk about “Continuous Packaging with docker and Project-Builder.org”. Well, my demo, which is due for LinuxCon EMEA, should then be ready and fully working as well as my slideset and content which I still need to develop ! This will be Friday the 31st of October between 9:00 and 12:20AM.

So a busy Friday as it seems. But I’ll also be there on Thursday, and hopefully as well for the OpenStack Summit the week after, but I don’t have a seat for now, so let’s see…

As usual, you can catch me at the end of the talks (even if this time, I won’t have as much time as in other events) and discuss about what you’re interested in that is also of interest to me !

Speaking at LinuxCon EMEA 2014

2014/08/30

I received confirmation and support for my travel at LinuxCon EMEA 2014 which will be in Düsseldorf, Germany from the 13th to the 15th of October. I’m pretty proud to have up to now presented in all the european LinuxCon events since 2011.

I’ll again animate a round table on FLOSS Governance. I’m now contacting potential panelists for this one and should announce them soon.

But I’ll also have a technical session in parallel on a subject I’m working on at the moment, and should get interest as it is docker related: Multi-OS Continuous Packaging with Docker and Project-Builder.org.

Ok, so now I need to go back to my source code to make it work and publish it before the conf don’t you think so ? :-)

First day at LinuxCon NA 2014

2014/08/22

Porec

Interesting to pass from vacation with family in Croatia to France after 10 hours of drive and then the day after being in a plane, flying to Chicago to attend my 3rd LinuxCon, held this time in the mythic Chicago city.

Chicago

While I arrived Monday evening, I had time to catch up some mail, make some conf calls on Tuesday before attending the first part of the event, which was the VIP dinner. An opportunity to talk to HP colleagues I met for the first time physically, even if we already interacted electronically previously.

VIP dinner

A view on the VIP Dinner

Wednesday the 20th was the first day of the event which started as usual with Jim Zemlin’s Keynote. This time he chose to talk about what the Linux Foundation rules disallow: The Linux Foundation itself ! And more largely about the roles of foundations to support open source development, their key cleaning facility role.

Jim Zemlin

Jim had a quite funny slide exaplining how everybody is seeing him, while what he is really doing is cleaning stuff so Linus, Greg and thouands of others could code and manage Linux.

He also announced the new LF certification program (Certified sysadmin and Engineers). While I understand the need of having more recognized Open Source ad Linux Professionals, unlinked to a company (such as the RHCE one) I wonder whether we were needing a new certification wile we do have LPI. I hope the 2 will cooperate to avoid again proliferation. Not that proliferation is bad per se. But why dedicate multiple times efforts to create training supports, manage registrations, … when someone already works on that, maybe in a different way, but maybe patchable to be adopted by the LF. Hopefully this will be solved somehow.

LF certifications

After that we had the also traditional Linux Kernel panel moderated by Greg Kroah-Hartmann with Andy, S, Andrew Morton and Linus Torvalds of course. Nothing really new came out. Anyway, it’s always refreshing to see our heros on stage full of confidence and hope for what they do.

Kernel Round Table

Linus insisted once more on the fact he wants Linux to be more dominant on the desktop market. As a 21 years linux desktop user myself, I can only be in agreement with that. Where is however the docker of the desktop, that will make everybody want to change and move to it ? When people see my Mageia distro they’re always surprised how many stuff you can do out of the box with a Linux Desktop. Phones have helped people go away from the monopoly interface but Macs do not help bringing back people to Linux. If at least all people attending LinuxCon and developing FLOSS would run Linux, that would be great !

Linus Torvalds

Then it was time for elective sessions. I chose first to know more about devstack.
Sean Dague from HP presented OpenStack in 10 Minutes with devstack
devstack pulls everything from git. As it heavily modifies your system so do rather that in a VM/Container. devstack launches tempest (the OpenStack test suite) at the end for the install. Sean insisted on the flow of requests generated inside OpenStack and demonstrated how you can easily modify the devstack environment and re-run it to test easily your modification.

devstack provides an easy way to support modifications through a conf file. Example given if you add
API_RATE_LIMIT=False
you’ll avoid waiting for an answers from the server in case of devstack exceeding the standard rate of queries.
You can also use localrc.conf to pass specific variables up to the right component.

In order to use it, you’d need 4GB RAM (recommended). It can run in a VM (cirros will work nested). Sean warned that it does not reclone git trees by default and clean.sh should put everything back in order (but cleans stuff !)

Sean Dague

Good presentation, easy to follow and having a quick demo part which confirms that devstack is easy to use :-)

Then I attended Joe Brockmeier’s (Red Hat) presentation around Solving the package issue

Joe explained the notion of SW collections (living under /opt). It’s Available for RHEL, CentOS and Fedora. It brings a new scl command. If you type for example
scl enable php54 “app –option”
that app uses now php 5.4 while the rest of the system ignores it.
For that you’ll need new packages: scl-utils and scl-utils-build
There is a tool spec2scl to convert spec files to generate scl compatible packages.
For more info you can look at http://softwarecollections.org

A remark I made to myself and which was later explicitely said during the presentation is that scl is useful for RHEL to provide newer versions of SW onto the enterprise distributions, while it can also help provide older versions of SW into Fedora (which is moving so fast that not all SW can adapt !).
It’s a sort of Debian backports for RHEL.
Joe also presented rpm-ostree (derived from ostree, git-like for system binaries providing an immutable tree). Under development for now, so not completely usable and probably the least interesting solution.
He moved on with docker, but was pretty generic (on purpose) and seeing it as complementary to package management, whether I think docker is another way of deploying software, which is not caring of packages by providing a layered deployment approach. While I have packaged docker for Mageia, I’m not yet familiar eough with it to be sure of that, and I’m currently working on combining it with project-builder.org. So will comment later on on that.

Joe Brockmeier

Then it was time to animate the FLOSS Governance roundtable for which I was attending LinuxCon. I had what I think is probably the best panel to cover the vast topic with Eileen Evans from HP, Tom Callaway from Red Hat, Gary O’Neall from Source Auditor Inc., Bradley Kuhn from Software Freedom Conservancy (and of course 45 minutes wasn’t sufficient to talk about all the subjects part of this), but I think the interactions were very interesting and lively and hope the audience enjoyed them and learned new aspects of this capital topic for our ecosystem. Of course we talked about licenses, SPDX and its future new 2.0 version, but also of foundations (echoing Jim Zemlin’s keynote), contribution agreements or tax usage (Thanks Bradley !).

FLOSS Governance Roundtable

And this is just the first of a series of such round tables I’ll lead in future events, but more on that later on.

After that, I discussed with Bradley Kuhn and Jilayne Lovejoy about licenses, AGPL, and various related topics, and their feedback were as usual very rich.

Was then time to go back to the latest keynote sessions. The first one I followed was from a new company (for me) CEO, Jay Rogers from Local Motors who tries to make open hardware in the automotive sector.Worth looking at and following whether they will be successful.

Jay Rogers

Then, our own Eileen Evans was on stage to explain her view on the new FLOSS Professional. And I think at her place I’d have been even more impressed as she had a full room so probably some pressure to talk to all these devs and devops. And I think her voice showed that at the begining. But when she entered in the details of the presentation, she did as usual a great job and was particularly convincing. She showed how the FLOSS professional was more than others issued from diverse backgrounds, as she illustrated with her own one. She also showed the variety of activities that each of these people have to cope with everyday, again with an illustration of one of her day of work passing from a contract management or OSRB meeting to an OpenStack foundation board conf call.

Eileen Evans keynote

And that approach of the new FLOSS professional was a convincing echo to Jim Zemlin’s call for more professionals and the focus on people that many speakers have underlined. The FLOSS ecosystem indeed needs so many various competencies in addition to developers and FLOSS is so ubiquituous that the lack of resources is delaying some projects. And Eileen explained why this notion of FLOSS Professional is arising now. Which is in short because FLOSS usage has moved from hobbist developing for themselves to professional developing during work hours. And she also covered the impact on companies where the work in network/communities, between peers is the rule compared to the siloed classical approach. And so companies need people understanding this way of working to evolve.

Eileen Evans

It was then time to catch a bus and enjoy discussing with peers at the Museum of Science and Industry during the evening event where we could also explore the museum.

Museum of Science and Industry of Chicago

Still working on MondoRescue 3.2 to make it available ASAP

2014/03/14

Even if stuff do not progrees at the speed I’d like them to progress (lots of travels on HP side since early 2014 and 4 concerts to perform on the private side) I’ve tried to improve the 3.2 version I published unofficially as beta. Interestingly enough, even when I do not announce that packages are delivered, there are people who do use them !!! Which gave me some feedback (you can guess it wasn’t that positive), so in fact it’s already my second delivery :-) and it contains some interesting new features:

  • mindi now uses the new mr-kernel-get-modules perl script which allows now in mindi to just mention end modules names andd not dependencies anymore, which are now computed by the script !! This will help a lot to maintain the list of modules, which was always impacted by low-level dependencies changes at kernel level.
  • Support of symlinks for newest distributions based on systemd such as Fedora, Mageia, … is now finally working !! Again this was done exporting the existing wrong code into a separate perl script which now operates correclty. This is part of the global willingness to recode most of mindi and some of mondo in perl. This took quite a long time, as of course, we need to stay compatible (a word systemd team doesn’t care about of course) with other tools, and older distributions. Side note, this is probably one of the reason MondoRescue is still appreciated by its community :-)
  • The introduction of a dependency on a perl function was incorrect and people trying to install from packages gave feedback that they had errors dof course ue to that. This is now fixed, as project-builder.org indeed had an issue because a low level function was depending on a higher level function not part of the perl modules provided for MondoRescue. With 0.12.5 of project-builder.org this is completely solved.
  • Now I still have regressions with the isolinux menus, NFS on Mageia 4 and systemd not working anymore (change of network NIC name is the root cause). However the ldlinux.c32 issue for syslinux > 5.x is now solved.

Next week is the TES, so won’t have much time to work on it. Expect news the week after.

project-builder.org 0.12.5 is now available

2014/02/07

Finally, after having published the version 0.12.3 on time for Linux.conf.au, I found some remaining bugs in it (problem of time based realease and not enough time to test), then I made a 0.12.4 version soon after as promised to solve these, but still missed some aspects, and those are now solved with this 0.12.5 version.

So this version fixes an issue with messages printed which were done in double, and also the way we manage naming of Debian versions, following the recent change for Debian 7 (using now only the major version, and not mentioning the minor version which is now useless).

I also fixed a dependency issue, seen when trying to install the beta of MondoRescue, where a function wasn’t provided in the perl-ProjectBuilder module, while used in the code :-( This is now solved, and I’ll now start working on the next MondoRescue beta which should now be installable with yum/apt-get/urpmi.

This project-builder.org version should now be stable to use for some weeks, as I do not plan to make big changes in it, as this is perfectly fitting my needs now. Of course, more could always been done, but I can’t advance on all sides at the same time, so now it’s MondoRescue‘s turn !

Enjoy !

Random thoughts after 3 days down under and 1 around Linux.conf.au

2014/01/07

Australia !
Back to Australia !
Shark Bay
Just after my arrival in Perth last Friday, I had a bit of time to walk in the city in order to have a view on it and feel the atmosphere.
View from the hotel
It’s an interesting mix of modern buildings and a bit less modern buildings !
Mix of buildings
Of course, Australia is a young country, with (from my point of view) mostly young people around (that’s where I see I’m getting old !). People are very nice, friendly and always ready to help with a smile. It’s my third time here, and it’s always been like that, that’s probably why I like coming back here.
Australian Steak
I had a dinner in what I found a strange place, the shed, where I had to show my ID before entering, which was pretty empty despite the size. Maybe because it was a bit early. The dinner was good, but I really felt alone !
That's where Perth performs savant music

It was then time to go back to the hotel for some mail, and the preparation of my Monday presentation.

Being in Australia during europe winter time is just great. As great that you can receive too much sun on your head ;-) Especially when you go to such a nice place as Fremantle !
Main Fremantle Street
I did that on Saturday (for once I had time around an event) in that city which is similar to a french mediteranean city like Cagnes sur mer e.g. (more from a climate perspective than an architectural one)
Hall Town
and so I passed the full day around, enjoying the view on the Indian Ocean (my first time),
Site seeing from Round House
and beach (nearly empty as very windy)
Fremantle beach
and the nice food you can eat on the harbour
View on the harbour
(remember that as french we put a lot of emphasis on this, and even more because it’s me ;-))
Lunch

One of the main building of Fremantle is their prison, which has been added to the World Heritage List of Unesco as a testimony of the role of convicts/prisoners sent to Australia to work there. One of the oldest building of the region, even if it’s just less than 200 years (old european reaction ;-))
Fremantle prison

It’ was also interesting to see that Fremantle uses Wikipedia to document their sites. They are adding QRCodes pointing to Wikipedia pages in order to make your visit more rich. That’s the first time I see that usage BTW.
Wikipedia QR code

Sunday was passed doing more preparation around project-builder.org release 0.12.3 and the presentation. I just took some time in the afternoon to go back in the city
Skyline view some strange trees in parks
Tree
and bells tower
Bells tower
before recognizing the itinerary to go to Linux.conf.au
LCA2014 Banner
hosted at the University of Western Australia
UWA
where we could register.
UWA main building
Despite not being at LCA for the first time, I attended Rusty Nelsson session on first timer LCA attendees, which was a nice way to start the event.First time session
After some more discussion at a nearby bar, it was time to finalize my presentation, and work on the demo. Took me up to 3AM, but was still not finished as I wanted !

On monday, LCA was starting.
Start of LCA
The first keynote was about Whistle-blowing (les lanceurs d’alerte for my french audience who like me would not happen to know what it is) and how their perception is changing in our post-Snowden era.
Dr Suelette Dreyfus
That was an interesting presentation of her finding through a survey they organized to gather data. Especially after having seen the keynote at LinuxCon EMEA around Living in a Surveillance State by Mikko Hypponen, which I highly recommend to watch,as it’s a very enlightning one.
Dr Suelette Dreyfus
However, during the Q&A session, I found a bit strange that the audience didn’t want to listen to the question from a doctor around how to determine what is good and what is bad, which was much more interesting that what they felt it could be. And I think he was right, as this is a real concern that should rather be dealt with, instead of just asking the person to shut up. The limit of what can be disclosed or not whether you are in a government or a private company wrt ethic aspects is really a difficult topic to solve and more debate should be left so more interesting input could be heard and answers brought to improve the quality of the debate.

And also it’s interesting that the spot is now only on the NSA, whereas we tend to forget that some months ago, we had the same questions around Facebook. Of course, people give willingly their info to Facebook while theydon’t to the NSA, and that’s a bad thing. However, it doesn’t rmove the other threat from companies like Facebook which should continue to be explained to all IT users and consumers.

There was a remark on the fact that US own 5 millions records of autralian citizens who have travelled to the US. Again, it’s easy to avoid that: do not travel to the US. If you want to go there, it seems normal to me they can ask for info beofre to protect themselves. Of course, the level of what is asked should be reasonable wrt the effect researched, and people have modification right son it and insurance it won’t be provided to other entities. But here I think they are in their own right to gather them. Of course, again nothing to do with what we’re learning regularly thanks to E. Snowden revelations with what the NSA is doing.

I passed the rest of the day mostly in the Continuous Integration miniconf which was also hosting my talk with the exception of a presentation around ansible and vagrant I wanted to follow in the sysadmin mini-conf. It turned out that this presentation wasn’t so interesting due to the lack of demo (no network). Too bad as I’m also testing ansible as time permits on my side and would have like to get insights.

So after that I took some time to finish my slidset for the pres of the afternoon and the demo I wanted to make. I think I’ll never been able to finish a presentation days in advance completely. Don’t get me wrong, I have plenty of material availblle and I can make any 3 days workshop on the fly just using what I already have. However, I like to tailor the presentation to the audience, the context, polish one or two stuff, remove slides and some new ones… And same with the demo. So even if I started early before coming, I just finished to publish project-builder.org 0.12.3 the morning (time for all packages to build), realized that some feature that I hadn’t tested enough were not working, so making just a last patch (c) to have my demo shiny !

So I missed some sessions in between and went back to the CI miniconf and really heard Anita Kuno’s talk on 3rd party testing with OpenStack (a good one on latest aspects of the project I wasn’t aware of – this one is moving soooo fast !).
Geology Building at UWA

And finally all went well (at least from my point of view of course, ask one of the around 40 people of the the audience for objective feedback !). Demo worked as expected (thanks for preparation ;-)) and as usual I din’t had enough time to cover all what I wanted to address. Will see now if my Continuous Packaging approach is supported more in Australia, and if project-builder.org gets adopted there to create more upstream packages for some projects. Those interested can find my presentation on SlideShare. The video is also available.
Perth Lighted building
End of day was dedicated to the CI BoF and a dinner with a lot of HP peers working on OpenStack on various aspects (always amazed to meet so many people involved in it as time passes that I wasn’t knowing before).

But that’s not the end ! More “awesome” presentations to see the days coming. And more pictures are available at https://plus.google.com/photos/112434061686721373729/albums/5966194867275136465

It starts as a happy new year indeed

2014/01/04

Well, would you really be surprised if i say that the begining of 2014 looks as promising (and as busy of course) as the end of 2013 was ?

While travelling to Linux.conf.au in Perth (28 hours door to door but could it be a better start for 2014 !) I had some time to look at Project-Builder.org, subject of my conference on Monday and also to MondoRescue.

For Project-Builder.org, I’ll publish a new version for LCA (0.12.3) which will fix rpmbootstrap for lastest Fedora (18-20), Mageia 3 and also other recent distros. Also as SVK is now broken on Mageia 3, I’m using git-svn to work on my laptop when remote, and thus pb supports it now. Some various fixes since last year release will also be done (better printing with VM/VE name for logs, improved ntp support, pbdistrogetparam command to easy shell interface…), but globally the software is pretty stable for my usage, so now it’s your turn to tell me what would be useful for you in it. I also need to make a newer presentation for Monday with a short demo.

For MondoRescue I’m not ready yet to publish a final version, so I have made for now a first beta for the 3.2.0 version. First this will be a new 3;x version as there are lots of changes in the code that may make it less reliable due to the adoption of dynamic memory allocation instead of static in a lot of functions. If I compare 3.0 and 3.2:

  • 3.0
    • total mr_asprintf usage : 646
    • total sprintf usage : 674
    • total strcpy usage : 560
    • total fgets usage : 79
    • total malloc_string usage : 367
    • total MAX_STR_LEN usage : 370
  • 3.2
    • total mr_asprintf usage : 1223
    • total sprintf usage : 166
    • total strcpy usage : 388
    • total fgets usage : 28
    • total malloc_string usage : 129
    • total MAX_STR_LEN usage : 221

Which means that a lot has been done in code changes between 3.0 and 3.2. But also a lot remains to do if we want to have no malloc_string nor MAX_STR_LEN at all. And also if I made mistakes in the mr_malloc/mr_asprintf/mr_free usage, the commands will crash. THat’s why I need your tests here ! I’ve made a full bakup restore cycle (which has revealed some issues that I fixed), but I’m far from being confident in the result.

Another consequence is that this version will probably have less fixes than previous ones as most of the time has been passed on code modernization.

And it will require new mindi and mindi-busybox versions. And these versions should finally work for systemd crazyness of removing /bin and /sbin (which broke MondoRescue for a too long time now). And you’ll need new perl modules in order to have it work correctly as I finally rewrote some bash mindi functions into perl to have what I consider better code.
Which means Fedora 18-20, Mageia 3 should work out of the box (at least my Mageia 3 now works correctly).

And expect again more pacthes to MondoRescue durnig the 28+ hours back home at the end of next week ;-)

So I wish to all readers a happy new year 2014 and hope it will start for you as it has for me !

Meeting at Linux.conf.au in Perth

2013/12/21

I’m again lucky to be able to fly in a plane for 20+ hours the first week of January to attend Linux.conf.au ! (And of course the 20+ hours of fly back ;-))

I’ll talk on Monday 06 January 2014 during the miniconf dedicated to Developer, Testing, Release and Continuous integration Automation of project-builder.org and the idea of Continuous packaging.

This has been possible only thanks to HP‘s support, its Open Source investment council, and the kindness of our VP & Deputy General Counsel, Cloud Computing and Open Source Eileen Evans who continues to support my travels at many Open Source conferences, and should be greatly thanked for that.

I’ll make a new version of the tool available to celebrate this, not that a lot has changed, but some fixes should be made available as packages, and it’s a long time since I published the last one. In fact, for me the tool is pretty stable and usable. I recently added git-svn support, as svk is broken with latest perl versions such as on my Mageia 3 :-( So learning slowly git, and still not liking it that much, but I have not a lot of other choices.

I still need to improve rpmbootstrap for the latest Fedora which changed their mirroring structure. Hopefully this will be done on time.

And as I’m on it, Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to you all readers !

Distro Recipes 2013: Nice first !

2013/04/09

Distro Recipes 2013
As indicated, I had the opportunity to talk during the first Distro Recipes event organized in Paris last week, at the invitation of Hupstream. As Yoann Sculo posted, this was a very interesting day for me, and I really regret I was busy to also attend the first day and the opening.

After a nice welcome breakfast, Aurélien Bompard started by presenting the Fedora distribution.
Aurélien Bompard presenting the Fedora distribution
He did a great job especially expalining how easy it was to become a Fedora maintainer, even if a comparison to Debian revealed that it’s much less different that what people may think (it also takes time to become a packager able to modify most distro packages) and I know by experience that the Fedora packagers are really picky (sometimes for not so good reasons) with new contributions.

After that I talked about HP and Linux distributions. I used in fact the standard HP marketing presentation of the company as a starter (modified of course to suit my needs and include more penguins !) in order to explain the span of our activities, our relationship with communities including distributions, announced that HP will even soon provide firmware for ProLiant servers under a package format (rpm and deb), the fact that HP doesn’t see Linux demand for desktop/laptop on the consumer market (no, it’s not just a price issue that would make Linux more appealing in that case as I justified) but that we do support Linux on some enterprise desktops/laptops. Hopefully this was useful and/or new to some of the audience.

Then Dodji Seketeli made the type of talk making you believe that you could contribute to gcc ! Of course, when he details how much time it took him to add some of the features of the next stable version, you know you can’t ! Well I at least ;-) Anyway lots of good news and features that make that future version 4.8 expected soon.
Dodji Seketeli on gcc

That conclude our morning sessions, and it was then time to eat !! Especially as we had a great buffet waiting for us as you can see:
Repas midi

In order to avoid a sleepy afternoon, we started right after by a round table with 7 people (!), that I had the pleasure to chair. With a representative of each distribution (Mageia, openSUSE, Fedora, Debian, Arch, Embedded) and a Microsoft representative, you could expect blood and swords fight ! Not at all, I was surprisingly happy that the elements were clearly exposed, each representative defending their own work rather than criticizing, and finding ways to propose more future joint work. Of course, some subjects such as LSB/FHS lead to more debate, but very constructive and I really enjoyed this time slot as a way to show that differences are an added value ! It was also the opportunity for me to meet with Colin Guthrie and Frédérc Crozat, which I had never met before. These distros should be happy to have such representatives defending them (and the others too of course ;-)) Finally if you have ideas to share to improve cross-distribution work , consider joining the mailing listdedicated to his topic and start sharing your ideas.

Then it was time again for the remaining presentations. The first was Lucas Nussbaum. Long time Debian Developer, (he is even running for the Debian Project Leader now, vote for him !) he made a convincing picture of the Debian ecosystem, the numerous Web sites that contributors can create to enhance the distribution with stats, infos, Ubuntu correlations, … As usual, Debian appears as a very mature distribution, with a strong Governance, being perl friendly… If I had to change I may well become a debianers. But isn’t it because of the pres, as the morning I was a fedorian ;-)
Lucas Nussbaum pour Debian

The next speaker was a long time Linux enthousiast Pierre Ficheux. In fact back when it was Minitel time (not 2.0) I used his xtel program !! Pierre made a presentation (in english but with the accent ;-)) around embedded Linux distributions, presenting various way to tailor one for your device (he was using a Raspberry Pi) depending whether you use an Ubuntu, a Yocto generated one or a pure OpenEmbedded linux one. Definitely a good idea to explore for my Pi !
Pierre Ficheux sur Yocto (Open Wide)

And then we had the lightnings talks. Aurélien Bompard was there again for HyperKitty. Too bad it’s devoted to mailan, as I think Sympa would also benefit from such a work, as their archive management (at least on the latest versions I used) could be improved.
Aurélien Bompard pour HyperKitty

I came then again on stage for a project-builder.org presentation (building cross-distro packages for upstream projects) and made a short demo which I think is explaining much more than my slides, so I plan on using it more in the future !

After me, Eric Leblond explained how his upstream project (ulogd2) wasn’t picked up correclty by most distributions and asked for help to improce that.

And final speaker was Nicolas Vérité who made a panel on all mobile Linux distributions, recommending to follow closely Tizen for the future as the main force in this area.
Nicolas Vérité sur Distros Mobile

Too bad it was already over. Anne closed the session and I’d like to thank her for the invitation and the perfect organization of this first cross-distributions vent as a real success. Well done and see you next year hopefully !
Anne Nicolas (Hupstream)

Meeting at the first Distro Recipes

2013/03/19

I’ve been kindly invited for the first Distro Recipes event in Paris the 4th and 5th of April.

As I have an internal HP meeting on the 4th, I’ll be only available at the end of that day, but will present on the 5th how Hardware manufacturers work with Linux distributions, giving the example of HP. I’ll also monitor a round table aound “Linux distributions: differences and commonalities” where we will try to have polite discussions ;-) about what makes a distribution unique, and what is instead worth sharing by collaborating. Finally I’ll also present during the lightning talks “Project-Builder.org: packaging for multi-OS Open Source Projects

So won’t have that too much time outside of presentations, as you can see, but would be happy anyway to meet with MondoRescue or Project-Builder.org or HP/Linux users and talk with them.

Anyway a great event to be in, as the list of speakers is really interesting, all majors distros being represented, and for sure very interesting new contacts to make, and hopefully the curiosity to discover these other distros that you don’t use :-) Come for the same reasons, and see you there !


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